Best Pillow for Droolers

Words by Leslie Lidot
September 10, 2021
13 Minute Read
13 Minute Read
Words by Leslie Lidot
September 10, 2021

Waking up in a puddle of drool is not only inconvenient, but it may also be embarrassing and smell bad. If you find yourself doing this frequently, you may have a drooling problem.

Since a pillow can make or break your sleep, we set out on a mission to find the ideal pillow for droolers and help you decide what's best for you. With so many alternatives, it all comes down to your personal tastes in terms of material and sleeping posture. Keep reading to learn about the best drooling pillows for a peaceful night's sleep.

1. Editor's Pick: ComfyCentre Orthopedic Memory Foam Pillow

Contour Memory Foam Pillow for Neck Pain

ComfyCentre's distinctive design memory foam cushion has a clean, elegant appearance that works well in modern households. It has an ergonomic design that follows the curves of your cervical vertebra, reducing neck strain. Because it follows the natural curvature of your neck, it provides better alignment while you sleep. This pillow is designed to relax your neck and shoulders while also supporting sensitive body regions like the ear.

After testing a variety of memory foam pillows, the ComfyCentre memory foam pillow maintains its shape and provides a higher density and quality than other manufacturers. The pillow's hypoallergenic and breathable memory foam cover eliminates the need to fluff it in the middle of the night to achieve the desired feel.

2. Coop Home Goods Adjustable Pillow

This pillow is filled with a blend of memory foam bits and microfiber clusters that feel unexpectedly supportive and luxurious at the same time, providing the perfect balance of soft and firm. Because it comes with extra stuffing that you can add or remove at home to create your own precise height, it's suitable for various positions. Just be careful while altering the fill; it can become a little messy, and it's not something you'll want to do frequently.

It's machine washable, so you can easily keep it clean by tossing it in with your pillow covers, and it rebounded back to shape following our pressure testing. It's also a best-seller on Amazon, with over 30,000 five-star ratings from customers who describe it as the "greatest pillow ever."

3. Home Decorators Collection Down Alternative Pillow

Don't be deceived by its modest price: this cushion from Home Depot's brand was a top performer, outperforming much more expensive designs. For starters, it passed rigorous laboratory testing without losing its shape after applied pressure, and it did not shrink after repeated washing machine cycles.

The outer cover is a luxury cotton velour fabric, and the stuffing is a down replacement that simulates actual down clusters. It received high marks from testers in categories such as comfort and general satisfaction, and they praised how light, fluffy, and attractive it was on their mattresses. 

4. Tuft & Needle Down Alternative Pillow Set

The poly filling is lightweight but substantially firmer than traditional down substitutes, making it ideal for side and back sleepers. It passed all of our Lab's tests, including pillowcase fit, shrinkage after laundering, and shape retention after we introduced weight. This is especially crucial for side sleepers, who require their pillow to maintain its shape throughout the night in order to maintain optimal alignment.

The way it stood up to pressure also impressive according to test; one customer said it "maintained its shape better than any other pillow I've ever used." What's more, they all said it was supportive and comfy to sleep on. It also has the added benefit of using synthetic down, which is less expensive and easier to care for.

5. Naturepedic Organic 2-in-1 Latex Pillow

The Global Organic Latex Standard has certified this cushion as organic, as it is made from natural latex from the rubber tree. The best aspect is that quality does not have to be sacrificed in the name of sustainability: in both lab and consumer tests, it received high marks. Users claimed the cushion was comfy, supportive, and kept them at a reasonable temperature once pressure was applied, and the outer cover washed nicely.

The latex fill is shredded so you may add or remove it as needed, and it's also two-sided with distinct textiles on either side. On one side, a stretchy, smooth material is designed to fit to the shape of your head and neck, while the other is a plush quilted side filled with PLA batting.

6. Slumber Cloud UltraCool Pillow

The Slumber Cloud UltraCool Pillow made with Outlast temperature regulation technology

This pillow is likewise constructed of a synthetic down replacement, but it's distinguished by its temperature-regulating Outlast viscose cover, which stores and releases body heat to keep you from overheating as you sleep. Testers universally agreed that it kept them at a comfortable body temperature throughout the night, and they praised it for maintaining its shape and overall comfort while sleeping.

Aside from its cooling properties, this pillow received high marks in the lab when it came to how well it retained its shape after usage, held up to washing, and fit into a pillowcase. Even if you don't sleep hot, this one is a good pick because it has proven to be durable.

7. Brookstone BioSense Layer Adjust Pillow

This cushion comes with three independent layers – soft, medium, and firm – that you can easily add or remove to modify it to your preferences. The soft layer is made of down alternative, the medium layer contains memory foam fragments, and the firm layer is made of solid foam. A machine washable polyester cover holds the layers together.

Consumer testers appreciated being able to experiment with the numerous inserts to get the right height and feel for them. Even though deciding which layers to use and in what sequence to position them took some guesswork, they all liked the concept and stated they'd use it again.

Causes of Drooling While Sleeping

1. Sleeping Position

Your sleeping positions may make you more prone to excessive drooling. Two sleeping positions that may be contributing to your problem are sleeping on your stomach and sleeping on your side.

2. Sleep Apnea

Due to gravity, saliva produced by your body is more likely to escape from the front or side of your mouth when it is facing downward. As a result, resting on your back in bed is a simple fix for the problem.

Sleep apnea is a condition in which a person stops breathing many times during the night. Excessive drooling is one of the symptoms of sleep apnea. Other signs and symptoms include snoring, waking up gasping for air in the middle of the night, excessive daytime drowsiness, and morning sore throat or dry mouth.

Drooling usually stops when sleep apnea is treated, but if it doesn't, there could be another problem at hand.

3. Dysphagia

Dysphagia is a term for trouble when swallowing that could be related to disorders such as Parkinson's, M.S., and muscular dystrophy. These disorders can cause muscles to malfunction, preventing the mouth from functioning properly and causing liquid to escape. However, the problem could be as simple as a sore throat that makes swallowing difficult.

4. Nasal Congestion

People are more inclined to breathe through their lips when their nasal pathways are clogged. Because of the increased amount of air traveling through your mouth, which stimulates saliva, facilitates movement, and forces it out of your mouth, open mouths tend to result in more drool finding its way onto your pillow.

5. Gastrointestinal Reflux Disorder

Chronic acid reflux is another name for GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease. Patients suffer heartburn as a result of stomach acid backing up in the esophagus.

As a result, swallowing might be difficult for people who complain of a lump in their throat. When the esophagus is irritated, the body produces more saliva in an attempt to flush the irritant out, resulting in drool.

6. Medications

Excess saliva is a side effect of some drugs. Antipsychotic drugs, particularly Clozapine, are the most common examples. Theoretically, the medicine disrupts the neurological system's function, causing additional saliva to be produced and preventing the mouth muscles from holding the liquid in or swallowing it down.

7. Allergies & Infections

Excessive drooling can be caused by an illness, particularly in the sinuses, since infections cause the body to generate additional saliva in the mouth as it tries to flush out the foreign invaders attacking the immune system. When the nasal cavities are obstructed, the body resorts to mouth breathing, which permits saliva to flow freely.

Allergies might be a problem as well. For example, allergies can cause blocked sinuses, which can result in undesired drainage in the form of nightly drool.

How to Stop and Prevent Excessive Drooling

Did you know that the average human makes 3 to 6 cups of saliva every day? We know, it's revolting. However, all that drool may not be as disgusting as you think.

Saliva is primarily made up of water and is an important component of good dental hygiene. Saliva helps you taste and chew, fights infections, reduces bad breath, and preserves your tooth enamel, in addition to keeping your teeth strong.

Even people who have established effective evening rituals may be frustrated by drooling while sleeping. So, what causes it, and how do you stop drooling in your sleep?

1. Switch Up Your Sleeping Position

Switching from a stomach or side sleeper to a back sleeper may be an easy way to stop drooling in your sleep. Because drool is most easy to occur from your mouth when it's slanted downward, the logic behind switching to back sleeping may be linked directly to gravity rules.

However, for some people, switching sleeping positions is easier said than done. Because roughly three-quarters of the population sleeps on their sides, side sleepers (and even stomach sleepers) may need to practice switching to back sleeping.

It's critical to have a comfy mattress that meets your tastes if you want to start sleeping on your back. While sleeping on your back isn't a cure-all and isn't recommended for everyone (pregnant women, for example), it's a good place to start if you want to reduce drooling during the night.

Tip: Placing a pillow beneath your knees will help relieve lower back tightness and make the adjustment to sleeping on your back easier.

2. Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea is a condition in which a person stops breathing many times during the night. Excessive drooling is one of the symptoms of sleep apnea. Other signs and symptoms include snoring, waking up gasping for air in the middle of the night, excessive daytime drowsiness, and morning sore throat or dry mouth.

Drooling usually stops when sleep apnea is treated, but if it doesn't, there could be another problem at hand.

3. Dysphagia

Dysphagia is a term for trouble when swallowing that could be related to disorders such as Parkinson's, M.S., and muscular dystrophy. These disorders can cause muscles to malfunction, preventing the mouth from functioning properly and causing liquid to escape. However, the problem could be as simple as a sore throat that makes swallowing difficult.

4. Nasal Congestion

People are more inclined to breathe through their lips when their nasal pathways are clogged. Because of the increased amount of air traveling through your mouth, which stimulates saliva, facilitates movement, and forces it out of your mouth, open mouths tend to result in more drool finding its way onto your pillow.

5. Gastrointestinal Reflux Disorder

Chronic acid reflux is another name for GERD, or gastroesophageal reflux disease. Patients suffer heartburn as a result of stomach acid backing up in the esophagus.

As a result, swallowing might be difficult for people who complain of a lump in their throat. When the esophagus is irritated, the body produces more saliva in an attempt to flush the irritant out, resulting in drool.

6. Medications

Excess saliva is a side effect of some drugs. Antipsychotic drugs, particularly Clozapine, are the most common examples. Theoretically, the medicine disrupts the neurological system's function, causing additional saliva to be produced and preventing the mouth muscles from holding the liquid in or swallowing it down.

7. Allergies & Infections

Excessive drooling can be caused by an illness, particularly in the sinuses, since infections cause the body to generate additional saliva in the mouth as it tries to flush out the foreign invaders attacking the immune system. When the nasal cavities are obstructed, the body resorts to mouth breathing, which permits saliva to flow freely.

Allergies might be a problem as well. For example, allergies can cause blocked sinuses, which can result in undesired drainage in the form of nightly drool.

How to Stop and Prevent Excessive Drooling

Did you know that the average human makes 3 to 6 cups of saliva every day? We know, it's revolting. However, all that drool may not be as disgusting as you think.

Saliva is primarily made up of water and is an important component of good dental hygiene. Saliva helps you taste and chew, fights infections, reduces bad breath, and preserves your tooth enamel, in addition to keeping your teeth strong.

Even people who have established effective evening rituals may be frustrated by drooling while sleeping. So, what causes it, and how do you stop drooling in your sleep?

1. Switch Up Your Sleeping Position

Switching from a stomach or side sleeper to a back sleeper may be an easy way to stop drooling in your sleep. Because drool is most easy to occur from your mouth when it's slanted downward, the logic behind switching to back sleeping may be linked directly to gravity rules.

However, for some people, switching sleeping positions is easier said than done. Because roughly three-quarters of the population sleeps on their sides, side sleepers (and even stomach sleepers) may need to practice switching to back sleeping.

It's critical to have a comfy mattress that meets your tastes if you want to start sleeping on your back. While sleeping on your back isn't a cure-all and isn't recommended for everyone (pregnant women, for example), it's a good place to start if you want to reduce drooling during the night.

Tip: Placing a pillow beneath your knees will help relieve lower back tightness and make the adjustment to sleeping on your back easier.

2. Lift Your Head

Whether you sleep on your back or side, propping up your head can help you avoid drooling in your sleep. Finding the perfect pillow for your new sleeping position is a simple approach to make the adjustment easier.

However, research has shown that pillows with too high a loft might put too much strain on your cranial and cervical spine alignment, so it's critical to choose the right loft for your needs. Back sleepers, for example, benefit from medium loft pillows comprised of down or down substitute materials.

Many back sleepers choose medium loft pillows with a thickness of 3 to 5 inches.

3. Invest in a mouth guard

A mouthpiece, often known as a mouthguard or night guard, is a device worn in the mouth at night to help alleviate TMJ or teeth grinding. Although mouthguards may cause more drooling at first, your mouth will acclimate to the sensation over time, and it may even help you control excessive drooling while sleeping.

Over-the-counter mouthguards are available, but dentists may build custom-fit mouthguards that are more comfortable because they are shaped particularly to your mouth.

Tip: While wearing a mouthguard at night may cause excessive drooling in the beginning, a custom-made mouthguard can assist limit discomfort and reduce drooling over time.

4. Stay Hydrated

As your muscular activity diminishes while you sleep, your saliva production naturally drops. This is what causes that terrible morning breath, but did you know that excessive saliva production during the night can also cause drooling?

Staying hydrated will help you avoid drooling in your sleep due to excessive saliva production. Staying hydrated during the day requires 64 ounces of water, but you'll also want to have some water near your bed to satiate your overnight thirst.

Tip: Mayo Clinic suggests consuming eight 8-ounce glasses of water per day, or roughly 8 ounces every three hours, to stay hydrated.

5. Treat Your Allergies

One of the most prevalent causes of drooling in your sleep is allergies, which are one of the most common annual irritants. Allergies might increase the probability of drooling during sleeping since congested noses commonly lead to mouth breathing.

“Respiratory allergies induce symptoms like nasal congestion, post-nasal drip, and itchy nose and eyes, and can be particularly irritating at night,” explains allergist Neeta Ogden, M.D., whether you have seasonal allergies or a sinus infection.

So, if allergies are the source of your nighttime saliva, what can you do to avoid drooling in your sleep? You might wish to try these suggestions, according to Ogden:

  • Keep your pets out of your bed: While sleeping with your dog or cat is fun, their dander could be causing your allergies in the bedroom.
  • Hypoallergenic sheets should be used: Silk, bamboo, TENCELTM, and cotton are among hypoallergenic bed sheet fabrics to look for (Percale or Sateen).
  • Use an air purifier: Air purifiers can help you control the humidity in your house, which can be a breeding ground for dust mites and other allergens otherwise.

Tip: At-home allergy solutions such as air purifiers, hypoallergenic bed linens, and avoiding contact with pet dander might help alleviate allergy symptoms that may be causing nighttime drooling.

6. Consider Medication

Doctors may recommend medicine to help you stop drooling while sleeping in specific cases. When not all treatments require a prescription, there are a number of common medical options that have proven to be effective for persons who drool while sleeping.

Scopolamine and glycopyrrolate are the two most commonly used medicines to treat sleep drooling. In a study of patients who used scopolamine patches, researchers discovered that those who used the patch experienced far less drooling than those who did not. Another trial using glycopyrrolate tablets discovered that patients who took the tablets experienced less drooling for the length of their treatment.

It's crucial to keep in mind, however, that drugs like scopolamine and glycopyrrolate might have negative side effects, including:

  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Increased heart rate
  • Parched mouth
  • Itchy eyes

Tip: Whether you're looking for a prescription to help you stop drooling in your sleep, speak with your doctor to see if you're a good candidate for medication.

Takeaway

While drooling in your sleep is inconvenient, the cause is frequently traced back to basic conditions such as allergies or sleeping position. If you find yourself waking up with an unexpected surprise on your pillow on a regular basis, you may want to consider cleaning it more frequently while you figure out a long-term solution.

A great sleep environment is the first step toward getting your best drool-free snooze. To get started on getting the sleep of your dreams, browse our selection of ergonomic and snooze-worthy pillows here.

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